How do you keep your mind focused?

 

Short answer: with small daily habits.

In my experience, being consistent is much easier if I practice small habits that are simple and easy to incorporate into the day. Rather than overanalyze, evaluate, and question what’s better to do, my goal is to keep things as simple as possible.

Because when you simplify habits, especially new habits, you’re much more likely to make them stick.

Here are 7 small habits that can keep your mind focused on what is important to you.

Small habit #1. Train your mind to focus early in the day with one question: What is the ONE THING I am committed to completing today? It keeps things simple, helps your brain focus better, makes you prioritize your goals, and streamlines the work you need to do on that particular day so you don’t feel overwhelmed with making too many choices. To do this, just write it in big bold letters on a sheet of paper and hang it on your bedroom or bathroom wall. Read it out loud as you start each day, and come up with an answer on the spot. Then, devote your time to completing what’s most important to you on that day.

Small habit #2. Give your body a chance to get energized with a short workout.

Doing physical exercise, even if it is targeted and short, can do wonders not just for your muscles but also for your brain. Exercise improves your brain’s cognitive performance, increases its problem solving ability, and even boosts long-term memory. You don’t need 2 hours at the gym, though. The goal is to be consistent, so even a short 30 minute workout will energize you and prepare you for the day. For example, you can try a morning yoga routine, a 20-minute power walk, or a 15 minute bootcamp session.

Small habit #3. Manage your time in short increments.

When you’re ready to start working, use a timer to divide up your workday into manageable increments that will allow your brain to focus in a more targeted and effective way. Try the Pomodoro technique which consists of 25 minute blocks of time, followed by 5 minute breaks. When you’re done with one segment, step away from your desk and do something completely unrelated to work to give your brain a chance to rest: get some fresh air, stretch your body, grab a cup of coffee or tea.

Small habit #4. Avoid distractions as much as possible.

Daily habits such as checking emails frequently are part of the norm these days. But these habits don’t just keep you distracted; according to the Harvard Business Review checking emails and multitasking can lower your IQ by up to 10 points. Scary, right? So unless you’re waiting for an urgent email for a project due on the same day, or an email that will change the course of your life, leave checking your inbox for later (during lunch or in the afternoon). Instead of checking emails first thing in the morning, use your well-rested brain to perform more complex problem-solving tasks.

Small habit #5. Get into the habit of writing stuff down.

The simple act of writing has a chemical effect on your brain by increasing blood flow to areas of your brain responsible for your memories. So, even though it’s easier for most of us to just type everything on our laptops or phones, we won’t get the same effect. How can you create a writing ritual? You can start a journal, write letters to friends by hand, create a detailed plan for the week or month, or draft a couple of ideas to post on your blog. The best part about writing regularly is that it can boost your memory and help you recall information when you need it.

Small habit #6. Harness your mind with a little meditation.

There’s a lot of information and even more advice on meditation, which can be a little overwhelming. You may think it’s an advanced practice that only certain personality types or professionals can do successfully. It’s actually easier than you think. The best part about meditating is that it can declutter your brain of thoughts that distract you, allow you to focus better throughout the day, and even help you cope more successfully with the day’s events. Start by downloading the Headspace app: the beginner level takes only 10 minutes, it’s fun and super easy.

Small habit #7. Empower your brain with plenty of sleep.

So what’s the big deal about sleeping? Here’s the thing—you don’t want to miss it. It’s okay to miss out on a full night’s rest due to upcoming exams or a big project at work; just don’t turn it into a bad habit. Chronic sleep deprivation can reduce your cognitive abilities, negatively impact your concentration, and even impact long-term memory and recall. If you find it difficult to wind down from your busy day, there are a few simple ways to do it right. For example, you can set a bedtime alarm on your phone about 30 minutes before bedtime, and you can practice a simple nighttime routine each evening to get you to bed on time.

How can I force myself to have the discipline and motivation to become the best version of myself?

If I were you, I would start by changing the words I use when talking to myself.

We don’t think about it often, but words are powerful. They shape our thoughts, they affect our personal growth, they impact our confidence. And they can be one of the most critical factors to our success in life.

And honestly, I don’t like the word force. When I hear it, I think of aggression, violence, pain, feeling passive and helpless. None of those feelings can get me motivated to do anything. So why would you want to force yourself to do anything? And more importantly, how do you imagine sticking to any action or habit if you force yourself to do it?

I’ll tell you what I like: the words brain training. When I hear them, I think of positive things—discipline, motivation, achievement, mastery, success. Even better: I feel like I have the power to do things and change them. This makes me feel much better about taking action and moving towards becoming the best version of myself.

So let’s go back to the original question and rephrase it:

How can I train my brain to have the discipline and motivation to become the best version of myself?

Much better!

The answer? There are many tips you can practice every day.

Here are 7 tips to get you started.

Tip #1. Build your unique daily routine. This practice will help you become the master of your own time. In addition, you’ll experience a greater sense of calm knowing in advance what your day will look like. It could be a simple morning routine to get you energized and start the day on a positive note, or doing your most complex work early in the day when your brain is well rested, or doing your most creative work late at night when you can be alone and away from distractions. The key is to plan it ahead and then do the same type of activity at the same time each day. You’ll create a routine customized to your specific needs, your goals, and what you believe to be most relevant to you.

Tip #2. Do your deep work early in the day. If you do, it will help you better deal with your procrastination habit. According to scientific research, the brain’s peak performance happens 2-4 hours after we wake up: so if you wake up at 7, your peak times are 9–11 a.m. Doing deep work at this time allows the brain to focus fully on the problem at hand, with fewer distractions, less inputs from our environment, and with a lot of energy that we’ve gained from a restful night. All you have to do is adjust your mornings a little. Stay away from checking emails before noon, leave calls and meetings for the mid to late afternoon, and listen to the news later in the day (while driving and running errands, for example).

Tip #3. Always have a goal to aspire to. When we have specific goals we want to achieve, everything we do in our daily lives will have a greater sense of purpose. It’s what makes the difference between just living life day to day, and living a life that has meaning. To help you focus on your goal, start each day with the question: What is the one thing I am committed to completing today? This question forces you to prioritize, helps your brain focus better, and streamlines the work you need to do on that particular day, so that you don’t feel stressed, tired, or overwhelmed with making too many choices.

Tip #4. Think about the big picture of your life. Focus on the work you’ve planned to complete today, but always keep your eye on at least two steps ahead. Don’t see any action you’re making today as an isolated incident. Think about its implications and potential consequences. Is your behavior geared towards achieving a one-time effect, or will you feel benefits in the long run? Is what you’re doing today going to help you become who you want to be next year, in 5, in 10 years? Become strategic so that you can achieve long term results that your future self can benefit from.

Tip #5. Replace saying “I can’t” with “why not?” whenever you’re faced with a challenge. Much like replacing the phrase, “how can I force myself” with “how can I train my brain”, this is yet another small adjustment in how we speak to ourselves that can have a positive effect on our life in the long term. We’re much better off if we spend a little time figuring out where the resistance is coming from (why do we think we can’t?), rather than give in to it immediately without a fight (“I can’t and that’s that!”). When we replace that phrase with “why not?”, we leave things open-ended. There is something quite powerful when we create that open space because it means we keep our mind open to possibilities, whatever they may be.

Tip #6. Improve your relationship with your mistakes. There’s a lot of truth in the statement: you either learn to fail or fail to learn. Making mistakes is a normal part of life. It’s how you approach them that matters. Try a different strategy of viewing your past by forgiving yourself for mistakes that you made. Reflect on them, learn from them, but don’t hold on to them. This applies to your relationships, your career, your education, and other areas of your life in which you feel you didn’t achieve what you wanted or underperformed in some way. By changing how you relate to mistakes, you will give yourself more freedom to manage your future more successfully.

Tip #7. Always, always be persistent. The writer Seth Godin said, “Never quit something with great long-term potential just because you can’t deal with the stress of the moment.” How true! What this means is that you should do your best to fight the urge to give up whenever things get tough, hard, or even ugly. Know the difference between what feels hard to do right now and what’s good for you in the long run. And let’s face it: nothing really big and truly amazing happens in one day or even a month. So next time you fail or fall, do your best to get up, dust yourself off, and keep going.

How can I learn to become more disciplined?

I love this question! And this is why: when it comes to matters of self-discipline, people often treat it as some sort of self-imposed punishment. It sounds uncomfortable, unnecessary, and harsh. In my opinion, it’s just a matter of shifting your mindset. Instead of seeing it in a negative light, think of how it can positively affect your life.

For me, self discipline means two things:

One, it’s a path to achieving mastery over your life.

And two, it gives you freedom to express the best version of yourself.

That is a powerful way of looking at it, don’t you think?

Now let’s take a look at how it can be done.

Here are 7 tips for instilling self-discipline into your life so that you can master the skills you need to, and so you can become the best version of yourself.

Tip 1. Take care of your essentials.

Before you embark on your path toward any type of achievement, it’s important to cover the basics. According to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, that means meeting the first level of physiological needs such as food, shelter, and clothing. Here is the first opportunity you have to practice self-discipline.

  • Food: Eat not just to be full, but also to stay healthy and maintain your brain’s optimal performance.
  • Exercise: Physical exercise is critical to performing well in every area of your life, so make sure to make it a daily habit.
  • Sleep: When you’re sleep-deprived, you’ll never be able to function at optimal levels, both physically and mentally. Be sure to get enough sleep.

Tip 2. Use your willpower the smart way.

When we wake up and start contemplating the day, we tend to get overwhelmed with the amount of things we need to do, so we end up procrastinating and postponing our tasks. That’s a critical mistake, because we all have a finite amount of willpower that takes us through the day. If you want to focus on priorities, work on them early.

  • Do that task that you’ve been putting off all week before lunchtime. It’s going to take much less time than if you leave if for the evening.
  • Write up a plan for the school or work week ahead of time. That way you won’t panic when a deadline is approaching.
  • Finish up homework you’ve been putting off because you’d rather do something more fun. You won’t need to stay up all night making up for lost time.

Tip 3. Start making commitments to yourself.

Commitments aren’t just promises you make to other people. You can (and should) make them to yourself. A great way to begin is to define a very specific goal you want to achieve in a certain time frame. Here are a few examples of what you can commit to:

  • I am committed to focusing on my studies in the next 30 days so that I can pass all three of my exams with top marks.
  • I am committed to finding a job in 6 months that is both a good fit for my skill set in and is in a company whose values I share and respect.
  • I am committed to building my physical endurance by running 4 times a week for 3 months so that I can be prepared to participate in a 5K race.

Tip 4. Make a new habit stick by keeping it simple.

Every habit we’d like to acquire needs self-discipline, time, and repetition. Does this sound intimidating to you? Maybe so because you positioned it that way: you feel like you “should” be doing something difficult when you’d rather be relaxing. If you are reading this, chances are you feel that it’s time to make some kind of change in your life: start working out, stop eating out so much, get more sleep, find more time to spend with family, watch TV less. To simplify a change you’re trying to make, start with tiny steps:

  • Do a mini-workout at home for 10 minutes this month before you buy that gym membership.
  • Start going to bed 15 minutes earlier than usual to give yourself time to de-stress and relax with a good book or soothing music.
  • Prepare and pack your lunch the night before so you don’t rush in the morning or eat junk food when you get hungry at noon.

Tip 5. Start saying NO more often.

Have you ever found yourself running out of time to do what you need or would like to do? It probably means you’re wasting time and energy on things that are not that important in the long run. Start building up your “no muscle” in small ways each day:

  • Just because there’s leftover cake in the fridge doesn’t mean you should eat a double portion for the next three days. Put it away or freeze it for another week.
  • When you’re in the middle of finishing up a project and a friend calls to invite you to a party, it doesn’t mean you should drop everything and go. It’s okay to politely say no.
  • When you’re in a dilemma about whether to commit to something or someone, think about your priorities. Be aware of what is important to you, so you’re less likely to ignore what is key to your personal and professional growth.

Tip 6. Anticipate that you’ll experience resistance.

When you expect everything to go well all the time, you’re likely to get disappointed every now and then. It’s a much better idea to plan ahead for those moments when you’re lazy, tired, or in a bad mood and nothing seems right.

  • First, tell yourself that whatever it is you’re feeling, it’s an emotional reaction and it will pass. Don’t give in to the urge to make decisions in that mindset.
  • Second, resist the urge to give up doing something that you know is good for you. Just because it feels uncomfortable now doesn’t mean it won’t have a positive impact on your life.
  • Third, nurture a growth mindset: instead of telling yourself that you are “just not good enough” to take on a new language or start practicing karate, give yourself the time to learn new things. You’ll be surprised how much you can do when you keep an open mind.

Tip 7. Believe in yourself.

It doesn’t matter what stage of life you find yourself in at the moment. You can be a college student, a parent of two, a university graduate looking for a job for the first time, or an entrepreneur embarking on a new venture. Believing in yourself is going to be a critical factor in helping you achieve your goals, no matter how small or big they are.

  • Start thinking about your acts of self-discipline in terms of the big picture of your life. Although it may feel like sacrificing some things right now, what does being disciplined afford you? If you are focused on something, how can it add up a year from now?
  • Put yourself in the driver’s seat of your life journey, instead of letting situations and external factors dictate how you will act. Don’t allow yourself to get carried away for emotional reasons that you lose track of why you started working on a goal to begin with.
  • Most important of all, believe. Believe you can do it. When you do, then self-discipline will become a skill you can apply to many areas of your life: your education, your career, and even your relationships. It will guide you and keep you focused on your future, and everything you want to achieve and become.

Is it possible to live today with Stoic habits?

It’s not only possible, it’s actually doable and beneficial for your personal development! The Stoics left us a blueprint for living that can make life easier to manage, instead of fighting it and resisting the things that don’t go our way. And no, it’s not just pure philosophy; it’s specific tips on how we can navigate life more successfully. They already did the hard work of setting the strategy. Now all we need to do is follow it and incorporate it into our 21st century life.

It can be done.

Here are 10 habits to help you live like a Stoic.

Stoic habit #1. Don’t waste energy on pointless activities.

The Roman Stoic philosopher Seneca devotes a section of his book On the Shortness of Life to this problem that plagued people even back then. He describes gluttony, vanity, focusing on materialistic things and trying to impress others. That’s not at all unlike our own world that’s focused on social media and often on creating a superficial image of lifestyles we see on Facebook and Instagram. There are ways to use your time more wisely: always focus on a specific goal you are striving towards. Don’t just keep it on an abstract level; actually create a plan to reach it. And don’t let random situations, chance, or other people’s behavior dictate how you lead your life. Seneca says that nothing happens to the wise man against his expectation.

Stoic habit #2. Practice gratitude for what you have today.

It’s common to focus on the things we see other people have, and that can make us feel frustrated and eventually unhappy. Meanwhile, there’s so much you already do have going for you. Think about what those things are. Set aside a few minutes each day to develop your own practice of gratitude. For example: list 3 things you’re grateful for in your life this very moment: having a home, a job, a skill you are good at, or a close friend who you enjoy spending time with.

Stoic habit #3. Don’t complain; get proactive about what’s possible.

It’s easy to complain, we tend to do it by default. We are human. And it doesn’t really take effort to do so. However, complaining won’t change a thing. What will is taking a proactive stand. What does that mean? It means do something about it. If there’s a situation you don’t like, think of ways to change it. Brainstorm what you will need to change it too: more resources, knowledge of a topic, or just more time to reach a goal. For additional support, ask a trusted friend or someone who is an expert in the field.

Stoic habit #4. Don’t make comfort your priority.

Being stoic doesn’t mean surrounding yourself with material things or other people so that you feel comfortable and you expect will make you happy. It means taking life in stride and making peace with discomfort. Why is this important? Because having something today can easily mean you take it for granted and expect it to last forever. What if it doesn’t? Learn to rely on yourself so that when tough times come around, you’re better prepared to deal with them. You can practice this by trying to solve problems by yourself first, even if that means making mistakes, before you give up or turn to someone else to help you fix the situation.

Stoic habit #5. Learn to manage your thoughts.

On any given day, you have thousands of thoughts running through your mind, and let’s face it, a lot of them are not exactly sunny and happy ones. They can also be negative, self-critical, dismissive, they can focus on past failures or tap into your insecurities. Think about this powerful statement for a second: you are not your thoughts. There are ways to manage your thoughts more successfully and even change your entire mindset. Start with a 10-minute meditation to calm your thoughts and read Carol Dweck’s book Mindset which can impact your entire attitude and how you experience life.

Stoic habit #6. Accept that you cannot control life, but there some things you can change.

Sure, you can’t control life, no matter how much you feel a deep desire to do so. But you can control how you react to it. That is always your prerogative and your right as a human being. Don’t think it’s possible? Read Viktor Frankl’s book Man’s Search For Meaning. It is a manual describing the psychology of survival, a real-life story written by a psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor who found strength to live in circumstances where most people would have given up. There are many lessons to take from this book that can last you a lifetime.

Stoic habit #7. Do your hard work first, before you do anything for pleasure.

On any given day, we give in to the urge to start our morning by checking social media apps on our phone and sending messages back and forth with our friends. But mornings are the ideal time of day to get the hardest work out of the way. Try maximizing each morning by building a habit of doing your hard work early. It will help you deal with the feelings of procrastination whenever you have to study for an exam or finish up a project for work. Even better: it will improve your focus and concentration so that your brain can do its brilliant work more efficiently and effectively than any other time of day.

Stoic habit #8. Learn to practice self-discipline with delayed gratification.

It may not seem like an awesome choice at first, but putting off doing what makes you feel great and gives you pleasure has its advantages. It’s about instilling a good dose of self-discipline so that you do something difficult first in order to reward yourself later. There’s even science to back this up: Stanford University’s Marshmallow experiment showed how delayed gratification can increase your chance at succeeding in many areas of your life. You can practice it too. For example, if you want to watch a movie or go out with friends, leave it for the evening after you have completed what you planned to work on during the day. And if you don’t finish it, don’t assume you’ll do it at midnight after you’re done having fun.

Stoic habit #9. Turn obstacles upside down by making them an opportunity to do something different.

What often happens when we are faced with an obstacle is that we stop everything we are doing and we start reacting, often emotionally. Maybe it’s a sign that we should just give up! Maybe it’s just too hard! Those are all emotional reactions. You can change your approach in three ways. First, start anticipating that there will be obstacles you will encounter on your path. If you prepare yourself psychologically for them, they won’t feel so devastating when they actually do happen. Second, use the opportunity to learn something new, to take a different approach to the problem, to think it through, and to try something different that can yield better results. And third, take advantage of the tough times to achieve mastery in one area so that you can become an expert at something.

Stoic habit #10. Work with, and not against your nature.

The Stoics didn’t believe in having to change ourselves completely in order to lead a life of quality. They believed that we should take advantage of our unique strengths and abilities. You can practice this in two ways. First, take an honest look at yourself: who you are, what you are doing, where you are going with your life. Are you overestimating your abilities or are you being objective and realistic about what you can do and how you can reach your goals? And second, think how you can take advantage of what you have going for you: your personality, your preferences, the things you’re good at, the skills you possess and take pride in. Then focus on doing exactly that and on developing your strengths, instead of worrying about potential weaknesses or the things you don’t already possess.

There’s a wonderful quote by Marcus Aurelius that sums up Stoic life really well:

Objective judgement, now, at this very moment.

Unselfish action, now, at this very moment.

Willing acceptance – now, at this very moment – of all external events.

That’s all you need.

If you’d like to read more, here are some book recommendations to explore the Stoic way of life:

How can I make every minute of the day count?

Take ownership of your day!

Sounds obvious, doesn’t it? Of course we own our day, who else would? But if you take a minute and think: once you finish your school or work routine, check Facebook and Twitter throughout the day, spend time on your phone, commute back and forth to where you need to go, and watch your favorite TV shows, what’s really left of your day? More important, what did you do in that 24-hour period that will matter 5, 10, 20 years from now?

It’s a hard question, but you should ask it!

And if you’re not pleased with your answer, then make the effort to change something. Make your minutes matter. That’s what taking ownership of your day is all about.

Now let’s think what can help you get there. Here are two ideas to get you started.

Idea #1. Make your mornings count in 3 ways.

ONE. Create a morning routine to give you more energy.

A routine that helps you start the day means that you become the master of your own time, you can start working on things that are important to you, and you can be more calm knowing in advance what your day will look like. For example:

TWO. Start your day with this question: What is the one thing I am committed to completing today?

  • Why this habit matters: it encourages you to think strategically about your life, it keeps you focused on your goals (both personal and professional), it forces you to prioritize, and it serves as a personal promise to yourself.
  • How you can incorporate this habit into your day: put it in writing. Write it in big bold letters on a sheet of paper and hang it on your bedroom or bathroom wall. Read it out loud as you start your day, and come up with an answer on the spot. Then, as you go through the day, make sure you’re working on completing what you’ve identified as your one thing.

THREE. Get your hard work done first.

We don’t function the same early in the morning as when we do at night. Our body and our brain are more likely to function better at certain times of day. It’s all about knowing your biological clock and how it works.

  • Why do hard work first? Because the early hours of the day are the optimal time for your analytical brain to perform the most complex tasks (in the case of studying, for example, these can be reading, comprehension, application, repetition). Some scientists call this time of day the brain’s peak performance time, and it’s about 2-4 hours after we wake up.
  • When exactly should you do it? If you wake up at 6, your peak performance times are between 8 and 10 a.m. Extend this time until lunch so that you cover the most important concepts when your brain is clear, less cluttered by additional tasks, and less likely to be distracted by events happening around you.

Idea #2. Think about the big picture using these 3 approaches.

ONE. Develop your life strategy.

Focus on the work you’ve planned to complete today, but always keep your eye on at least two steps ahead. When you have a strategy in place, everything you do each day will have more purpose. Try this:

  • Rethink your behavior: This applies to what you do each day and how you react to what’s happening around you. Is your behavior geared towards achieving a one-time effect, or will you feel benefits in the long run?
  • Think in terms of active versus passive: As you go about your day, are you merely reacting to events, people, and circumstances, or are you being proactive about them and providing value in some way to yourself and also to other people?

TWO. Set long-term goals for yourself.

This evening, take 30 minutes to write down the following:

  • Identify your top 3 goals. For example: graduate from college, get an advanced degree, find a job that is the best fit for your skill set, develop a skill that you’ve always wanted, get physically fit, relocate to a city or country where you would like to live and work, etc.
  • Under each goal, write down 3 things you can do on a regular basis to make progress. For example: if your goal is to get physically fit, then the things you should focus on can be creating a meal plan for the week to eat healthier, working out regularly, and doing research on YouTube for fun workouts that don’t take up too much time and can be incorporated easily into your day.
  • Then, create a weekly schedule to fit in the activities you’ve identified as important to achieving your goal. Divide each day into hourly increments, then block off time for your responsibilities, commute, meal times. You should still be able to find an hour to fit in 1–2 activities important to your goal. Too busy? Start with a small block of 15 minutes.

THREE. Use the end of the day to dream big.

Evenings are great for strategic thinking because it’s a time for the brain to settle into a different tempo when it can be more creative. If you’re setting goals and strategizing where you want to be in 6 months or a year with your personal development, this is when you can outline your next steps. For example:

  • Ask yourself: Where do you see yourself in the future, who do you want to become, what would be an ideal lifestyle for you?
  • Map out your dreams: Write down in detail what this ideal lifestyle would be like. Cover all areas of your life: what is that dream job, the daily schedule, the people you’d be working with? What does the city look like, the apartment or house you’d be living in, the commute to work? Do you see yourself with a partner, a family, children, with pets? Dedicate some time to describing everything in detail.
  • Make it visual: Get a large sheet of paper, then find photographs (from magazines, for example) that look like a visual representation of what you’d like your ideal lifestyle to be. Add pictures and write down phrases that are powerful and meaningful to you, and that pertain to your goals: your college degree, the perfect job, your ideal and fit self, your dream home, the dog you’d like to have one day, etc.
  • Incorporate it into your day: Put your vision map somewhere where you can see it first thing in the morning: in the bathroom as you’re brushing your teeth or in the bedroom when you’re getting dressed. Look at it often, absorb the pictures, read the words. Make it a daily habit to spend time observing everything you’ve put on your vision map.
  • Make the connection: As you’re looking at your vision map each day, ask yourself what you can do today to get you closer to your dreams. It is only when we are proactive about our life that we can truly make dreams come alive, make them real, make them part of who we want to become.

How can you benefit from a 30-day plan to study smarter?

If you’ve been following me on Quora, Twitter or this blog, you saw that I share many study tips and hacks that can boost productivity and make your learning experience as efficient as possible, and even enjoyable in the process! In the past few months I received numerous requests from students worldwide to put together these study tips in a book format so they’re easy to read, and also to suggest ways in which they can be incorporated into a daily schedule.

The result? I just completed an e-book called Your Study Smarter 30-Day Plan.

Who is this e-book for?

Your Study Smarter 30-Day Plan is designed for the busy student who wants to improve the way they study, boost focus and concentration, stay motivated while preparing for exams, make the most of each study day, and still have time to unwind and have fun despite a heavy workload during the semester.

How can you benefit from this e-book?

The key idea behind this e-book is to help you study smarter by building very small habits and gradually incorporating them into your day. There are several benefits of this method: it will help you structure your day and establish a routine for you to follow, it will show you how to make small changes for maximum effect in the way your study, and it will introduce something new that you can master over time through repetition. The plan will provide you with a framework of things to choose from, habits to grow, and new ideas to implement into your day.

How is this e-book organized?

This e-book is divided into 4 main sections, one for each week of the month. In each week you will introduce a couple of new habits to your usual daily routine that will help you structure your day and study in a focused way so that you can perform better in your classes. Then, you will practice the new habits throughout the week so that you can get used to them, which will in turn help you reinforce the new behavior to stick better. Each section consists of the following elements:

  • An outline for each week
  • An introduction to new mini-habits to practice for that specific week
  • A list of practical suggestions on how to practice each mini habit
  • A motivational tip of the day to boost your focus
  • A daily checklist to monitor your progress

When and where can you purchase it?

The e-book is available today. Get a copy of Your Study Smarter 30-Day Plan here.

Questions? Add a comment below!

How do I study smarter? There’s a cool resource in the works for you to check out!

How do I study smarter?

That’s the #1 question I keep hearing on social media, websites, and directly from people I interact with regularly. Many students post questions to me on Quora, my Twitter account, directly via email and on my blog. It’s a great question!

The good news first:

There are a LOT of excellent answers, ideas, and suggestions out there. If you just follow some popular hashtags such as #productivity and #studyhacks, you will see thousands of ideas on how to improve your study technique. Some suggestions are concise while others go more in depth; some provide plenty of diverse suggestions while others focus on one tip to follow. Either way, you’ll never find a shortage of studying advice.

And now for the challenging part:

In the sea of advice, students often lose the way. They get distracted: how do you know which advice you should pay attention to? Or they feel overwhelmed: there’s so much to read, how can you possibly learn everything? Or they feel stuck: sure, the advice you read sounds motivating enough, but how are you supposed to put it in practice?

After spending years as a student (for a grand total of 3 degrees, of which two are graduate ones!), I know personally how challenging all this can be. So I wanted to do something helpful. That is why I am currently working on an e-book called The Study Smarter 30-Day Plan. As the name suggests, it won’t be just a compilation of ideas on how to study smarter, but a real plan that you can incorporate into a 4-week period. You will get a breakdown of each week, plus a daily schedule, all in a fun and easy-to-read format. And all you need to do is just follow it. That should take a lot of the guesswork and the planning out of the equation, right?

That’s the goal.

I’m almost done with putting the e-book together, and I will share details with you in the next few days. Stay tuned!